The future aint bright and it aint fucking Orange either

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The Daily Mail.

  Spivs Comment

Look at the anguish on the faces of these people as they queue for free food. The free food isn’t provided by the government. It is provided by the people, for the people. It seems likely that Greece is being monitored by the elites to test the reaction of the population. This is so as the ‘elites’ know what to expect and prepare for as they get ready to collapse the economies of Spain and Portugal. The ultimate aim being to crash the Euro.

In November 2011 the IMF vowed to do everything in their power to keep the Euro going. I wrote at the time that they would do fuck all… They haven’t.

To a certain extent, Greece is being bailed out. When the Euro collapses there will be no countries to bail anyone out. Then people will starve. All part of the master plan.  Get up of your knee’s people. Do not let it happen.

Cash-strapped Greek health service in crisis as hospitals run out of gloves and gowns

Greece is facing a rise in hospital-acquired infections because its cash-strapped health service cannot afford basic supplies such as gloves, gowns and alcohol wipes.

Europe’s top health official said Greek hospitals are in such dire straits that staff are failing to keep up basic disease controls, threatening a rise in multi-drug-resistant infections.

Greece already has one of the worst problems in Europe with hospital-acquired infections, and disease experts fear this is being made worse by a severe economic crisis that has cut health care staffing levels and hurt standards of care.

Greece is facing a rise in hospital-acquired infections because its cash-strapped health service cannot afford basic supplies such as gloves, gowns and alcohol wipes (picture posed by model)Greece is facing a rise in hospital-acquired infections because its cash-strapped health service cannot afford basic supplies such as gloves, gowns and alcohol wipes (picture posed by model)

With fewer doctors and nurses to look after more patients, and hospitals running low on cash for supplies, risks are being taken even with basic hygiene, said Marc Sprenger, director of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

‘I have seen places…where the financial situation did not allow even for basic requirements like gloves, gowns and alcohol wipes,’ Mr Sprenger said after a two-day trip to Athens, where he visited hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

‘We already knew Greece is in a very bad situation regarding antibiotic resistant infections, and after visiting hospitals there I’m now really convinced we have reached one minute to midnight in this battle,’ he said.

 

 

Mr Sprenger said the situation means patients with highly-infectious diseases like tuberculosis (TB) may not get the treatment they need, raising the risk that dangerous drug-resistant forms will tighten their grip on Europe.

Many health workers have lost their jobs and others say they have not been properly paid for months. 

Panos Papanicolaou, a member of a doctors’ union and a neurosurgeon at Athens’ Nikea General Hospital, said staff cuts mean as many as 90 to 100 patients a day wait in corridors with many unable to get treatment. In the chaos, some go untreated or come back again when they are far more seriously ill.

He said overworked nurses often treat twice as many patients as before and confirmed that the shortage of basic items like disposable gloves meant corners were having to be cut.

‘If a nurse has to see 10 patients instead of five without disposable gloves it’s certain that the transmission of infections will rise rapidly,’ he said.

Greece could soon face even more problems with its health care system if it runs out of money to buy drugs.

Another health official who asked to remain anonymous said a senior Athens hospital worker had told him there was no budget left for supplies at that hospital, so all its drug purchases were on credit.

Roberto Bertollini, the World Health Organisation’s chief scientist and representative to the European Union, told Reuters he too was worried about the rate of hospital-acquired infections in Greece. He said cuts to resources and staff only make it harder to adhere to infection control and hygiene rules.

‘Countries have to be very careful when..choosing what to cut and what to keep,’ he said. ‘This is a very serious business which might impact the health of the population much more in the medium term, thus increasing rather than decreasing costs.’

Greece, Cyprus, Portugal and Poland to pull out of Eurovision because they’re so deep in debt

Four of Europe’s most cash-strapped countries are set to pull out of the Eurovision song contest – in case they win and have to host the lavish event the next year.

Greece, Cyprus, Portugal and Poland have all said they are ‘very unlikely’ to take part in the cheesy singing contest that has become a European institution.

The Greeks also said they could barely afford this year’s £100,000 fee to enter an act, and that ‘sequins and stage effects’ were distasteful at a time of austerity.

The four countries said they are 'very unlikely' to enter the competition next yearNo contest: The four countries said they are ‘very unlikely’ to enter the competition next year

Greeks protesting in October about the interference in their finances from Germany. Pulling out of the Eurovision would be another sign of the country's economic woesGreeks protesting in October about the interference in their finances from Germany. Pulling out of the Eurovision would be another sign of the country’s economic woes

An official at Greece’s state-owned television network said: ‘It’s not just that we don’t have the money to pay to enter, at this point it would be morally wrong.

‘And winning it would incur a huge expense for our country next year.’

The cost of staging Eurovision is put at around £60million.

Cyprus state broadcaster PIK said entering the contest would be ‘provocative’ when it was imposing drastic belt-tightening measures on its population.

Greece was represented by Eleftheria Eleftheriou this year but said they could barely afford the £100,000 fee to enterGreece was represented by Eleftheria Eleftheriou this year but said they could barely afford the £100,000 fee to enter

Portugal and Poland also cited ‘financial reasons’ over the cost of entering and possibly having to host the event, due to take place in Swedish capital Malmo in May next year.

Poland, which also pulled out last year, issued a statement saying: ‘After a very careful analysis we made the difficult decision not to take part.

The countries between them have garnered just one victory – Greece in 2005, when Helena Paparizou’s ‘My Number One’ came out on top.

Greece first entered the competition in 1974, while Cyprus joined the fray 7 years later.

Of the four Portugal is the longest-running having entered every years since 1964.

Poland is the relative newcomer, having seen its first entrant in 1994.

The rush of nations pulling out comes after Spain’s entrant for the 2012 contest was urged to sing badly and not to win, to avoid any risk of having stage the competition in 2013.

Bosses of Spanish public television told pop star Pastor Soler ‘to throw’ her entry amid massive government spending to reduce the huge national debt.

The 33-year-old singer said directors of state-run broadcaster TVE called her in to say: ‘Please don’t win. We don’t want to pay for it in 2013.’

She added: ‘I can understand why they asked. The money would be better spent paying ordinary people’s wages.’

The Eurovision Song Contest – an annual competition organised by member countries of the European Broadcasting Union – has take place 57 times since it’s debut in 1956, with Switzerland winning the inaugural tournament.

There have actually been 60 winners after a four-way tie in 1969, with 26 different countries having won the contest.The UK has claimed victory four times.

The most victories for a single country is seven by Ireland, with two of those – in 1980 and 1987 – performed by Johnny Logan, making him the only person to have won more than once as performer.

Portugal is the country with the longest history in the contest without a win – it made its forty-sixth appearance at the 2012 contest.

No joy: Portugal is the country with the longest history in the contest without a win with entrants such as Sofia singing 'Foi Magia' in 2004 failing to make the gradeNo joy: Portugal is the country with the longest history in the contest without a win with entrants such as Sofia singing ‘Foi Magia’ in 2004 failing to make the grade

WIN WHEN YOU’RE SINGING: THE PAST 15 WINNERS OF THE COMPETITION

Eurovision winners

The voting techniques have evolved throughout the years but central to them has been the calling on of the points by a representative from each country.

While Eurovision provides a unique opportunity for winning artists to capitalise on their success, relatively few have actually gone on to stardom.

The most notable exception to this was Abba who won the 1974 contest for Sweden with their song Waterloo and went on to be one of the most successful bands of its time.

Another notable winner who subsequently achieved international fame was Céline Dion, who won the 1988 contest for Switzerland with the song Ne partez pas sans moi.