SEVEN

Chris Spivey/The Daily Mail

 

Here is one for you numerologists to work out.

On the seventh day of the week (arguably), on the seventh day of the seventh month, Andy Murray is the first British male in seventy seven years to win Wimbledon.

In doing so he broke Novak Djokovic’s serve in the seventh game of every set.

The last British female to win Wimbledon was Virginia Wade who swept to victory in 1977.

Course, the 7th of July is also the anniversary of the London 7/7 bombings although that fact went largely unmentioned.

On that day The first  bomb exploded on a 6-car London Underground C69 and C77 Stock Circle line sub-surface train, number 204, travelling eastbound between Liverpool Street and Aldgate.

The bus bombing in Russell Square brought the total of bombs detonated that day  to seven.

According to Wikipedia:

The effects of the bombs are understood to have varied due to the differing characteristics of the tunnels in which they occurred. The Circle line is a “cut and cover” sub-surface tunnel, about 7 m (21 ft) deep.

Continuous news coverage of the attacks was broadcast throughout 7 July, by both BBC1 and ITV1, uninterrupted until 7 p.m.

Coincidentally, yesterday (7/7/13) also saw a Boeing 777 Flight 214 (2+1+4=7),   crash in San Francisco.

However, what really caught my attention was the fact that Murray survived the Dunblane shooting.

According to the Daily Mail:

He grew up in Dunblane and was just eight when killer Thomas Hamilton stormed into his school to shoot dead 17 people, mostly children, before turning a gun on himself.

For those of you who don’t know about Dunblane, the following is taken from my article Parliamentary Paedophiles, which can be read in full by clicking HERE

The Dunblane massacre and subsequent links to the British Government are many. You only need to ask yourself why files relating to the public enquiry have been made subject to a 100 yr disclosure rule, instead of the usual 30 years to realise that. You would in fact be entitled to ask; why have the files been locked away at all? After all, it was meant to be a public enquiry.

I suppose that it could be partly because Hamilton ran a paedophile ring for some very powerful people. Another reason could be that the loathsome George Robertson was the man responsible for getting Hamilton’s gun licence renewed after the Police had turned him down.

That act alone means that he too has the murder of those poor little boys and girls on his hands. I won’t say that he has their murder on his conscience since the arseholes in Westminster are all devoid of one.

No doubt having read this far, you will probably have guessed that Giovanni Di Stefano also has the low down on Robertson:

He is very well known to police in the UK. He was removed by the US government because they found out about his perverted taste for boys. They were going to expose him if he did not resign, so we got the “I’m resigning for family reasons bull shit) Robertson is a dangerous predatory paedophile.

Course, it goes without saying that the public enquiry into Dunblane was a whitewash from start to finish. The following piece is taken from the excellent website, thescum.info which documents in detail, the Government involvement in the massacre.

The inquiry into the Dunblane massacre was a massive cover-up, a top Scots Freemason has sensationally claimed. Former Grand Master Lord Burton says that Lord Cullen’s official probe suppressed crucial information to protect high-profile legal figures. He says they may belong to a secretive “Super-Mason” group called The Speculative Society. Some had links to the Queen Victoria School – where gunman Thomas Hamilton was allowed to roam free before the 1996 atrocity.

The TPUC website also has plenty of detail on Dunblane. Amongst other things, they have this to say and these questions to ask:

Blair government insider Lord Robertson has threatened to sue Scotland’s leading independent newspaper over internet allegations that he not only used his influence as a Freemason to procure a gun licence for child killer Thomas Hamilton, but was also a member of a clandestine paedophile ring reportedly set up by Hamilton for the British elite.

On 13 March 1996, Hamilton, armed with four hand-guns, opened fire on a junior school class, killing 16 children and one teacher before turning the gun on himself, shattering forever the idyllic 13th century Scottish town of Dunblane. Lord Robertson was the referee on Thomas Hamilton’s shotgun licence. [FACT]

The latest allegations came to light following a campaign to lift the secrecy on the Dunblane massacre. Large sections of the police report were banned from the public domain under a 100-year secrecy order. Lord Cullen, an establishment insider, also omitted and censored references to the documents in his final report.

Parents and teachers were advised to concentrate their efforts on a campaign to outlaw handguns instead of focusing on how the mentally unstable Freemason, already known by the police to be a paedophile, had obtained a firearms licence for six handguns. Hamilton allegedly enjoyed good relations with both local Labour luminary George Robertson and Michael Forsyth, the then Scottish Secretary of State and MP for Stirling.

Forsyth congratulated and encouraged Hamilton for running a boy’s club. Hamilton was also found to have exchanged letters with the British monarch, Queen Elizabeth…

Why, when Thomas Hamilton’s application for a gun licence was turned down, due to him being regarded as a man of unsound character [and] him being the object of several paedophilia investigations, did his MP, George Robertson (now Lord Robertson, Secretary-General of NATO), write him a glowing character reference, and personally see to it that his application was successful, when he knew the grounds for the original refusal were because he was suspected of procuring boys for sexual services?”

Dunblane may have been just over 11 years ago (this info dates back to 2007), but the questions still loom, that have to be answered.

1.No proper Autopsy and no inquest on Hamilton?

2. Reasons unknown – Shoots Kids? – was he a scape goat to get rid of evidence of a paedophile ring of MP’s and Mason’s in Scotland? – There seems to be mounting evidence to prove this theory.

3. Receives Shotgun Licence even though he was turned down by normal channels – Why was Lord Robertson not prosecuted for refereeing his application?

4. Why did he shoot himself with a different gun from the one he shot the kid’s with, even though the first gun still had rounds in it? – Strange to say the least.

These and many more questions, still remain unanswered.

Now, while the answer to these questions remain unanswered, these questions and many more relating to the massacre have in fact been asked under the freedom of information act. Predictably and rather tellingly, these requests for answers have all come back as being ‘refused’.

http://www.whatdotheyknow.com/search/dunblane/all?authenticity_token=q2PupKUlZsW6n1D71PvNtL0XWjMZ3I9I%2BdR8fbNfizI%3D&commit=Search

 

Course, Murray looks set to be rewarded by the Queen for his endeavours.

Never a good sign in my opinion.

 You can find more shit about the number 7 HERE

 

Did the magic power of seven kill off the Curse of Cameron? Murray’s win came on 7/7, 77 years after Fred Perry (and he broke Djokovic’s serve in seventh game of each set)

  • PM’s jinx may have been lifted by the mystical power of the number seven
  • There were fears Cameron’s well-wishing was hexing UK tennis players
  • But historic victory appears to have vindicated Cameron’s support

By NEIL SEARS

PUBLISHED: 23:40, 7 July 2013 | UPDATED: 23:41, 7 July 2013

Some feared Andy Murray would be scuppered by the ‘curse of Cameron’ – but it may have been lucky number seven that sent him into seventh heaven.

For superstitious tennis fans were quick to observe that his victory in the men’s final at Wimbledon came 77 years after a Briton last secured the title, with Fred Perry’s success in 1936.

Yesterday was of course the seventh day of the seventh month.

He's done it! David Cameron roars with delight as Andy Murray clinches the championship winning point yesterdayHe’s done it! David Cameron roars with delight as Andy Murray clinches the championship winning point yesterday
Agony: The PM suffers with every lost point on courtAgony: The PM suffers with every lost point on court

And keen observers will have noted that Murray broke Novak Djokovic’s serve in the seventh game of every set.

Those who pooh-pooh the concept of the lucky number might be swayed by the fact that while Murray and Djokovic are both 26, our Scottish hero was born seven days before yesterday’s loser.

 

And surely only hardened cynics would ignore the fact that Britain’s last singles title winner, Virginia Wade, had her moment of glory in 1977.

Belief that seven is a lucky number goes back centuries – while the ‘curse of Cameron’ had only gained credence in recent months.

Cameron blows out his cheeks as the tension mounts
Cameron is a keen tennis fan but some feared he was jinxing UK tennis hopefuls

Cameron blows out his cheeks as the tension mounts… but is soon gripped again

Phew: He wipes away away a tear as mother Mary looks onPhew: He wipes away away a tear as mother Mary looks on

The Prime Minister had been accused of being a bad omen after his hopes of victory heralded failure for sports stars including female tennis player Laura Robson, cyclist Mark Cavendish and diver Tom Daley.

He sent his best wishes to British number one Laura Robson, 19, shortly before her fourth-round exit last week.

But Mr Cameron defied those begging him to stay away from this year’s final by sitting in the Royal Box at Centre Court and  clapping enthusiastically at every point Murray won.

Before the match Mr Cameron said: ‘I think the whole country has been incredibly impressed, not just with his skill but with his courage and his mental courage in coming through to the final yet again.

‘The whole country is right behind you Andy – go for it.’

Murray had defended Mr Cameron’s good luck messages and seemed unperturbed by the ‘Jonah’ Premier being present.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2358006/Did-magic-power-seven-kill-Curse-Cameron-Murrays-win-came-7-7-77-years-Fred-Perry-broke-Djokovics-serve-seventh-game-set.html#ixzz2YPY6ao4o
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Making of Murray: How Andy survived the Dunblane massacre to grow into a sporting superstar

  • Murray was spotted by junior coach Leon Smith at the age of five
  • He grew up in Dunblane and was just eight when killer Thomas Hamilton stormed his school shooting 17 people dead
  • Murray trained on the Spanish clay courts of the Sanchez-Casal Acade

By TARA BRADY

PUBLISHED: 17:56, 7 July 2013 | UPDATED: 02:10, 8 July 2013

Andy Murray aged eight was described as unbelievably competitive Andy Murray aged eight was described as unbelievably competitive

For the best part of a decade he remained something of an enigma – the dour Scot whose public persona left a lot to be desired.

But that all changed when Andy Murray let his guard down last year and, in so doing, won the nation’s hearts.

As Britain’s man of the moment, the boy from Dunblane has come a long way.

Born in Glasgow in 1987, Murray was spotted by junior coach Leon Smith at the age of five and, even then, was described as ‘unbelievably competitive’.

He grew up in Dunblane and was just eight when killer Thomas Hamilton stormed into his school to shoot dead 17 people, mostly children, before turning a gun on himself.

Murray spoke publicly about the Dunblane massacre for the first time in a BBC documentary aired on the eve of this year’s Wimbledon championships and was reduced to tears before he uttered a word.

The British number one’s parents separated when he was nine, and he and brother Jamie went to live with their father Will.

Their sibling rivalry was no secret – as a youngster, Jamie was rated the second-best junior player in the world and beating him became Murray’s greatest motivation.

 

 

Yet he nearly abandoned tennis altogether to pursue a career in football.

Fortunately he rejected an offer from Rangers when they tried to sign him at the age of 13.

Instead he headed for the Spanish city of Barcelona where he trained on the clay courts of the Sanchez-Casal Acade.

Brotherly love: Andy Murray aged two with his older brother Jamie Brotherly love: Andy Murray aged two with his older brother Jamie

Andy (left) with older brother Jamie - who also plays professionally - in Wimbledon T-shirtsAndy (left) with older brother Jamie – who also plays professionally – in Wimbledon T-shirts

 

 

On the beach and Andy (in white T-shirt) plays with brother Jamie and a friend - it may only be Swingball, but with those racquets the Murray boys mean businessOn the beach and Andy (in white T-shirt) plays with brother Jamie and a friend – it may only be Swingball, but with those racquets the Murray boys mean business

Aged 5 and Andy is already getting to grips with that blistering backhandAged 5 and Andy is already getting to grips with that blistering backhand

Rising star: The tennis-mad boy who made history becoming the first British man to win Wimbledon since 1936 Rising star: The tennis-mad boy who made history becoming the first British man to win Wimbledon since 1936
As a boy: A 12-year-old Andy Murray playing tennis in Edinburgh As a boy: A 12-year-old Andy Murray playing tennis in Edinburgh

 

Always competitive: An 11-year-old Andy Murray with dyed hair on holiday playing snooker aged 11 Always competitive: An 11-year-old Andy Murray with dyed hair on holiday playing snooker aged 11

Superstar in the making: Tennis player Andy Murray pictured in 2003Superstar in the making: Tennis player Andy Murray pictured in 2003
High hopes: Tennis legend John McEnroe coaching Andy Murray aged 18 in 2005 High hopes: Tennis legend John McEnroe coaching Andy Murray aged 18 in 2005

When he won the junior US Open in 2004, it was obvious a star was in the making.

But in an era dominated by Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, and latterly Novak Djokovic, Murray initially struggled to get the results he hoped for.

However, he won his first major contest as an 18-year-old and broke into the top 10 a year later, reaching a grand slam final for the first time at the US Open in 2008.

Close: Andy Murray with his parents Will and Judy who have supported him throughout his sporting careerClose: Andy Murray with his parents Will and Judy who have supported him throughout his sporting career
Andy Murray playing at Wimbledon in 2005 where he became first Scot to reach third round at WimbledonAndy Murray playing at Wimbledon in 2005 where he became first Scot to reach third round at Wimbledon

There he lost out to Federer.

More finals followed, at the Australian Open in 2010 and 2011, but Murraycould not even win a set.
His career took a turn for the better last year when the taciturn Scot began working with eight-time slam winner Ivan Lendl.

And at Wimbledon last year, Murray became the first British man to make it to the singles final in 74 years – and proved to the world that the boy from Dunblane had finally matured.

The tennis star returned to Dunblane last year after he won the U.S. Open and his gold medal in the London 2012 Olympic Games The tennis star returned to Dunblane last year after he won the U.S. Open and his gold medal in the London 2012 Olympic Games
Murray survived the Dunblane Massacre and returned to the town a sporting hero Murray survived the Dunblane Massacre and returned to the town a sporting hero

It was not his loss to Roger Federer that mattered – but the tears Murray shed as he finally gave the British public an insight into his hopes and dreams.

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The country gave him its backing and, when he took Federer on just weeks later on Wimbledon’s main stage, they cheered him to Olympic glory.

It may not have been a grand slam, but Murray went on to defeat that demon a short time later when he beat Djokovic at the US Open.

He may have kept the nation at arm’s length as a young hopeful but his decision to reverse this policy has earned him a legion of fans.

Murray now engages with his supporters on Twitter where he now offers the public a regular insight into his life.

Confessions to enjoying ice-cream, a Playstation addiction and his affection for his beloved border terriers Maggie May and Rusty may seem inconsequential but it is these little gestures that continue to win hearts and minds and make him the nation’s number one.

ANDY MURRAY: HOW HE CLIMBED HIS WAY TO THE TOP TO WIN WIMBLEDON

1987: Born May 15, Glasgow, Scotland.

1999: December – Wins junior Orange Bowl title in Miami.

2004: September – Becomes first British winner of US Open boys’ title, beating Ukrainian Sergiy Stakhovsky.

2005: March – Becomes youngest British Davis Cup player, aged 17, in match against Israel.

June – Defeats Radek Stepanek to become first Scot to reach third round at Wimbledon. Loses to David Nalbandian.

October – Reaches first ATP final at Thailand Open, losing to Roger Federer.

2006: February – Claims first ATP title by beating Lleyton Hewitt in San Jose.

February – Moves above Tim Henman and Greg Rusedski in rankings to become British number one.

April – Splits from coach Mark Petchey.

July – American Brad Gilbert appointed Murray’s new coach.

2007: May – Snaps a tendon in his wrist at the Hamburg Masters, and the injury forces him to miss the French Open and Wimbledon.

November – Splits from coach Gilbert.

2008: July – Loses to Rafael Nadal in Wimbledon quarter-finals.

August – Defeats Novak Djokovic in Cincinnati to claim first Masters Series title.

September – Beats top seed Nadal in semi-finals of US Open to reach first grand slam final, where he loses 6-2 7-5 6-2 to defending champion Federer.

2009: June – Loses to Fernando Gonzalez in French Open quarter-finals.

June – Becomes first British player since 1938 to win Queen’s Club title, beating James Blake in the final.

July – Reaches first Wimbledon semi-final but loses 6-4 4-6 7-6 7-6 to Andy Roddick.

August – Wins Montreal Masters with victory over Juan Martin Del Potro, and becomes world number two for first time.

2010: January – Loses 6-3 6-4 7-6 to Federer in Australian Open final.

July – Loses Wimbledon semi-final 6-4 7-6 6-4 to Nadal. Splits with coach Miles Maclagan after two and a half years.

2011: January – Beaten 6-4 6-2 6-3 by Djokovic in second successive Australian Open final.

June – Loses 6-4 7-5 6-4 to eventual champion Nadal in French Open semi-final.

September – Loses 6-4 6-2 3-6 6-2 to Nadal in US Open semi-final.

December – Hires eight-time grand slam winner Ivan Lendl as his new coach.

2012: January – Loses 6-3 3-6 6-7 6-1 7-5 to Djokovic in Australian Open semi-final lasting four hours and 50 minutes.

June – Murray’s French Open run ends in the quarter-finals with defeat by David Ferrer.

July – Reaches Wimbledon final for the first time with victory over Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, but loses 4-6 7-5 6-3 6-4 to Federer who lands a record-equalling seventh title. Murray breaks down in tears in his on-court interview, saying: ‘I’m getting closer.’

August – Wins Olympic gold in singles at Wimbledon by beating Federer 6-2 6-1 6-4, and takes silver in mixed doubles with Laura Robson.

September – Finally breaks his grand slam duck, beating Djokovic 7-6 (12/10) 7-5 2-6 3-6 6-2 to win the US Open.

December – Finishes third in the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year awards.

Awarded an OBE in the New Year Honours list.

2013: January – After beating Federer in the semi-finals, Murray loses 6-7 (2/7) 7-6 (7/3) 6-3 6-2 to Djokovic in the Australian Open final.

May – Forced to pull out of the French Open due to a back injury.

June – Wins his third AEGON Championships at Queen’s Club, beating Marin Cilic in the final.

July 5 – Reaches his second Wimbledon final, beating Poland’s Jerzy Janowicz 6-7 (2/7) 6-4 6-4 6-3 in the semi-finals to set up a match against world number one Djokovic.

More than a mouthful: Murray can eat 50 pieces of sushi in one sitting!

By Eleanor Harding and Tom Kelly

It’s a delicacy usually consumed in small portions. But Andy Murray is such a fan of sushi he is able to eat 50 portions in one sitting.

High in protein and carbohydrates, the fish-based diet  has helped the British number one build up an imposing 6ft 3in, 13½ stone frame.

Without the extra rations the Scot’s punishing schedule would see him lose around 8kg of muscle in a year.

Andy Murray shows off his muscles on the court
Andy Murray poses with his runner up trophy after the finals match against Switzerland's Roger Federer

What a difference: High protein and carbohydrates as well as a rigorous workout regime has transformed Andy Murray’s body

He needs to eat within an hour of the end of a match and makes sure his team has tracked down a high-quality sushi restaurant wherever he plays.

At Wimbledon he has been known to put sushi in an ice cooler so he can have it brought to him at the end of a late game.

He also eats large quantities of red meat, pasta and rice spread over six meals in a day. Breakfast is a yoghurt and a peanut butter bagel with a protein shake.

The 6,000 calories a day are washed down with at least six litres of water. Alcohol, processed foods and sugar are avoided at all costs.

The energy-rich meals are burned off throughout the day during his tennis sessions, hot Bikram yoga, stretches and weight training.

Nino Severino, who has coached top British players, says: ‘Andy is such a physical player that every time he slams down his foot he is basically ripping his body to shreds. He then needs to replenish the lost protein because that’s a big element of rebuilding. Players like sushi because it tastes fresh and is not fried.

‘There’s something called a glycaemic window. The body needs the carbohydrates and protein to replenish the muscles and the liver with glycogen. The rice helps that process.’

The Australian Institute of Sport has recommended sushi for all its athletes in the past and tennis ace Serena Williams and baseball star Alex Rodriguez are fans. Scientists believe the benefits of sushi are one reason the Japanese are among the healthiest nations in the world.

The omega-3 fatty acids in fish are linked to heart protection and improved circulation and rice is a good source of protein.

Meanwhile, the seaweed wrapped around the rolls is rich in iodine. But despite its healthy reputation, the Japanese food came under attack recently from those who say it is worse than a McDonalds takeaway.

Critics say many sushi rolls contain very little fish and are laced with fatty mayonnaise – not to mention filled with processed carbohydrates.

Soy sauce, which often accompanies a sushi lunch, contains high salt levels – as does otherwise healthy miso soup.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2357872/Andy-Murray-How-Wimbledon-champ-survived-Dunblane-massacre-grow-sporting-superstar.html#ixzz2YPhaAMB8
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