Satanic Majesties

The Daily Mail

I’m hugely disappointed that she left hospital alive and hope to fuck the hospital has done a roll call of their nurses.


This ghastly parasite is the personification of  pure evil… Scroll down for photos.

However, should you be in any doubt who the  the Head of the Church of England pays homage to. Check out Nurse Florence Nightmare’s belt buckle.

Be afraid… Be very afraid.

Healthy and happy Queen leaves hospital smiling after being treated for nasty stomach bug

  • The Queen taken to King Edward VII Hospital with suspected gastroenteritis
  • It is the 86-year-old monarchs first hospital visit in ten years
  • All official royal engagements this week cancelled or postponed
  • Likely to be caused by winter vomiting bug norovirus, medical experts say
  • After a visit from her personal physician this morning, she left at 2.45pm
  • Palace says despite being allowed home today, her diary remains suspended

By REBECCA ENGLISH, ROYAL CORRESPONDENT and MARTIN ROBINSON

PUBLISHED: 15:47, 3 March 2013 | UPDATED: 19:10, 4 March 2013

 

Getting better: The Queen walked unaided out of the Marylebone hospital without any help after being taken their for treatment last nightGetting better: The Queen walked unaided out of the Marylebone hospital this afternoon after being taken there for treatment last night

The Queen left hospital this afternoon after being admitted with symptoms of gastroenteritis 24 hours ago.

She was taken to King Edward VII Hospital in London last night – her first time for a decade – but insisted that there must be ‘no fuss’.

Despite suffering from debilitating sickness, the 86-year-old refused to allow an ambulance to collect her.

Smiling as she walked unaided out of the hospital’s main doors at around 2.45pm today, she stopped to thank nurses for their care before getting into a waiting car.

This morning she received a visit from her personal physician, Professor John Cunningham, who arrived by scooter.

Prof Cunningham has been Head of the Medical Household to HM the Queen since 2005 and also occupies the position of Physician to the Queen.

It would be entirely routine for him to assess the Queen in this way, in addition to the care she is receiving from the private hospital’s own staff.

His visit appears to have led to her being allowed to return home.

After his check-up, activity around the hospital increased ahead of the Queen’s expected discharge, with a large Bentley driving into the building’s internal courtyard and the police presence increasing, including police outriders.

Despite being allowed home the Queen’s diary for this week would remain suspended, the Palace has confirmed.

‘Engagements cancelled or postponed this week remain so. Next week we’ll have to see, as she has only just been released from hospital,’ a spokesman said.

It has emerged that yesterday, as she waited for her car to pick her up instead of an ambulance, Her Majesty even decided that she might as well honour one more long-standing engagement.

She awarded a favourite female member of staff a medal for long service in her private apartments at Windsor Castle, where she had been advised to rest.

A source said: ‘It would have to be something extremely serious for her to let a loyal member of her household down.’

Doctors have speculated that the Queen is suffering from norovirus, the winter vomiting bug that closes hundreds of hospital wards every year.

 

With a handbag over one arm, and clutching a neck scarf and one glove as she prepared to shake the hands of waiting hospital staff, the Queen emerged in good spiritsWith a handbag over one arm, and clutching a neck scarf and one glove as she prepared to shake the hands of waiting hospital staff, the Queen emerged in good spirits

She left hospital this afternoon after being admitted with symptoms of gastroenteritis 24 hours ago She left hospital this afternoon after being admitted with symptoms of gastroenteritis 24 hours ago

Despite suffering from debilitating sickness, the 86-year-old refused to allow an ambulance to collect herDespite suffering from debilitating sickness, the 86-year-old refused to allow an ambulance to collect her

 

This morning she received a visit from her personal physician, Professor John Cunningham, who arrived by scooter. The visit it is believed to have led to her being dischargedThis morning she received a visit from her personal physician, Professor John Cunningham, who arrived by scooter. The visit it is believed to have led to her being discharged

 

It would be entirely routine for him to assess the Queen in this way, in addition to the care she is receiving from the private hospital's own staffIt would be entirely routine for him to assess the Queen in this way, in addition to the care she is receiving from the private hospital’s own staff

 

Doctors monitored the Queen very closely before her exit today. They were checking that the 86-year-old was properly hydrated and monitoring her pulse and blood pressureDoctors monitored the Queen very closely before her exit today. They were checking that the 86-year-old was properly hydrated and monitoring her pulse and blood pressure

Exit: The smiling Queen left King Edward VII Hospital this afternoon and thanked staff for their care over the past 24 hoursExit: The smiling Queen left King Edward VII Hospital this afternoon and thanked staff for their care over the past 24 hours

 

Queen
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II leaves the King Edward VII hospital following a one-day stay caused by a stomach ailment

Going home: Despite feeling very poorly over recent days Her Majesty showed she was in good spirits as she left hospital and got into her Bentley (right)

 

Well-placed sources said that after handing to Janet Doel, her housemaid at Windsor Castle, a Bar to the Royal Victorian Medal (silver) yesterday, the Queen insisted on walking to her car by herself, before also walking in through the hospital doors at the King Edward VII Hospital in Central London.

Her Majesty did – ‘reluctantly’ – agree to cancel her engagements for the next week, including a high-profile visit to Rome, which indicates that the stomach bug which struck on Friday has taken its toll.

But aides were asked to stress that she was in ‘good health and good spirits’, and said she regarded the hospital stay as merely a ‘minor inconvenience’.

And it will be business as usual for her husband, the Duke of Edinburgh,  who remained at home and will undertake a solo public engagement today. 

It is due to be a normal working day for  Philip as he attends an event as an Honorary Member of the Imperial Poona  Yacht Club at the Royal Thames Yacht Club in Kingston.

Indeed, none of the Queen’s immediate family visited her during her stay – though they were being continually updated about her condition.


It was only the fifth occasion in her six- decade reign that the Queen had been taken to hospital, where the Duchess of Cambridge was treated for acute pregnancy-related sickness in December

Doctors have speculated that the Queen is suffering from norovirus, the winter vomiting bug that closes hundreds of hospital wards every yearDoctors have speculated that the Queen is suffering from norovirus, the winter vomiting bug that closes hundreds of hospital wards every year

Despite being allowed home the Queen's diary for this week would remain suspended, the Palace has confirmedDespite being allowed home the Queen’s diary for this week would remain suspended, the Palace has confirmed

 


Her Majesty did – ‘reluctantly’ – agree to cancel her engagements for the next week, including a high-profile visit to Rome, which indicates that the stomach bug which struck on Friday has taken its toll

Doctors monitored the Queen very closely before her exit today.

They were checking that the 86-year-old was properly hydrated and monitoring her pulse and blood pressure.

She was most likely given saline solution via an intravenous drip to ensure she is hydrated.

Experts say it is ‘rare’ for people suffering from gastroenteritis to be admitted to hospital.

But if someone is admitted with the infection, it is likely that they will stay in hospital between two and five days, said Dr Anton Emmanuel, the consultant gastroenterologist, who works at London’s University College Hospital as well as King Edward VII’s Hospital where the Queen is being treated.

 

‘Symptoms typically include lots of loose motion and vomiting, abdominal pain and fever. For most, it is self-resolving and not a big deal.

‘People only tend to be hospitalised if they are dehydrated or to control symptoms of fever, pain or vomiting.

‘In the western world it is very rarely a thing that causes morbidity. Most of the time we only admit people as a precaution.’

As the Queen was taken to hospital it is believed that Prince Charles was in Wales with his wife following a public engagement while Prince William, the Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry were travelling back from Switzerland after attending a friend’s wedding.

It was only the fifth occasion in her six- decade reign that the Queen had been taken to hospital, where the Duchess of Cambridge was treated for acute pregnancy-related sickness in December.

 

Visit: Professor John Cunningham, the Queen's physician, leaves King Edward VII hospital on his scooter just before it was announced The Queen was to return home Visit: Professor John Cunningham, the Queen’s physician, leaves King Edward VII hospital on his scooter just before it was announced The Queen was to return home

A ROYAL SHOW OF TRUST IN KATE’S HOAX-CALL HOSPITAL

The Queen is being treated in the hospital where the Duchess of Cambridge stayed just three months ago with severe morning sickness.

Tragically, a few days after the Duchess was admitted to King Edward VII Hospital in central London, a nurse committed suicide after a hoax phone call.

Jacintha Saldanha spoke to two DJs from an Australian radio station – who were pretending to be the Queen and Prince Charles – asking for an update of the Duchess’s condition and put them through to a nurse on her ward.

Pranked: While the Duchess of Cambridge, pictured with Prince William leaving the hospital, was treated for acute morning sickness, King Edward VII hospital was subjected to a hoax-phone callHospital pranked: While the Duchess of Cambridge, pictured outside the King Edward VII Hospital, was treated for acute morning sickness it was subjected to a hoax-phone call which was blamed for a nurse’s suicide

The 46-year-old was found hanged in her living quarters after a recording of the conversation was broadcast worldwide.

Hospital staff have insisted the nurse was not reprimanded for taking the call, but sources close to the family claim she was ‘ticked-off’.

Senior managers were also accused of failing to support the devastated nurse after the prank because they were more concerned about the hospital’s image.

Big protection: PC Wallyn and a colleague outside the hospital last nightBig protection: PC Wallyn and a colleague outside the hospital last night

But the Queen’s admission to the private hospital yesterday indicates it is still trusted by the Royal Family.

The Queen is the hospital’s patron and in December 2003, underwent an operation there to remove torn cartilage from her left knee.

A night’s stay reportedly costs £1,000 and each room has an en-suite bathroom and large flat-screen TV. 

The hospital says it recruits the highest-performing doctors in the country and claims to be so clean there has never been a case of MRSA or C-difficile.

The Queen can also take heart that Britain’s tallest policeman is standing guard outside the hospital.

At 7ft 2in, Anthony Wallyn, 26, of the Westminster Police Borough Support Unit, was among the officers manning the door. 

PC Wallyn, who has his uniform custom made and imports his size 17 shoes from America, said he was used to the attention his height attracted.

He said: ‘If I work in the West End, I get anywhere between 100 and 500 requests for a photo. It’s like being famous but without the money.’

Last week the Queen undertook almost a dozen official engagements and meetings, including a trip to the Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel – leading to speculation over whether she may have contracted the illness there.

During her visit to the hospital in East London on Wednesday, she toured the renal  ward, children’s playroom and dining areas. However, the Department of Health said there have been no recent outbreaks of the illness on the hospital’s wards.

Experts have speculated that doctors may be forced to administer fluids either orally or intravenously in order to prevent the monarch from becoming dehydrated, which is a significant risk in elderly patients suffering from diarrhoea and vomiting bugs.

Gastroenteritis is an infection of the stomach and bowel, most commonly caused by either norovirus or food poisoning, and is often passed on by hand to hand contact.

Danger to the elderly

Despite her advancing years, the Queen, who will celebrate the 60th anniversary of her official coronation in June, still conducts hundreds of official engagements each year.

In 2012 she undertook 425 meetings, visits and investitures – 100 more than the previous year – and publicly re-affirmed her determination to serve her people for the rest of her life, putting paid to continuing speculation that she would consider abdicating in favour of Prince Charles, her son and heir.

Inevitably, however, yesterday’s developments will  spark renewed debate as to whether the nation is asking too much of its elderly monarch and her husband.

Philip will turn 92 this  summer and despite recently suffering several bouts of ill-health himself, has just announced plans to fly to Toronto next month for a military engagement. Likewise, the hugely pragmatic Queen abhors any  ‘fuss’ and will see her hospitalisation, sources say, merely as a ‘minor inconvenience’.

Remarkably for someone who has visited so many hospitals in her six decades as monarch, the Queen is believed to have been hospitalised just five times in her life, the first in July 1982 when she had to have a wisdom tooth extracted.

In January 1994, she broke her left wrist in a horse riding accident, although the injury wasn’t diagnosed for 24 hours, during which time she remounted her horse and rode back to Sandringham.

The last time that the Queen was hospitalised was in 2003, when she underwent surgery on her right knee in January of that year, followed by her left knee that December.

Her determination for business as usual to continue also means she has cancelled barely a handful of engagements over the years, largely due to unusually heavy colds or, more recently, back pain.

Among the key engagements she has been forced to cancel this week was a two-day visit  to Rome, her only foreign visit until at least the end of the year.

She and her husband  had been due to lunch with the outgoing president of Italy, a keen monarchist who has a photograph of the Queen on his desk at work and last night sent his best wishes for her speedy recovery.

She has also been due to visit HMS Lancaster at West India Quay in London on Tuesday and had already cancelled an appearance at a military celebration in Wales during the country’s St David’s Day celebrations on Saturday.

The Prime Minister, David Cameron, last night sent a message wishing the Queen well and said ‘he hopes she makes a speedy recovery’.

THE QUEEN HAS A VERY BUSY YEAR AHEAD OF HER ONCE SHE RECOVERS

Britain's Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip

The Queen has a busy month ahead of her, with her annual Commonwealth Day speech set for the start of next week.

Although the monarch, who is being treated in hospital for symptoms of gastroenteritis, has cancelled her engagements this week, including a two-day trip to Rome, Buckingham Palace said it was too early to say whether she would attend forthcoming events.

On Monday, the Queen, who places great importance on her role as head of the Commonwealth, is due to speak in front of 2,000 people at the annual Commonwealth Observance multi-faith service in Westminster Abbey in central London.

She delivers her message each year at the celebration of the Commonwealth and in 2013 is set to speak on the theme of opportunity through enterprise.

After the service, the Queen is due to attend the Commonwealth Reception given by the Commonwealth Secretary-General at Marlborough House (pictured above with Prince Philip on the same day last year).

Since 1977, Commonwealth Day has been celebrated every year on the second Monday in March.
Other engagements coming up include a joint visit to Tech City, east London, on Wednesday March 13 with her son the Duke of York.

On Thursday March 14, the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh are due at a service at the Guards’ Chapel to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the Soldiers and Airmen’s Scripture Readers Association.

On Thursday March 28, the Queen is also scheduled to distribute the Royal Maundy at the Maundy Service in Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford.

In April, she turns 87 while Prince Philip’s 92nd birthday is in June.

As well as being the birth year of a future King or Queen with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s baby due in July, 2013 marks the 60th anniversary of the Queen’s coronation, including a service of celebration at Westminster Abbey in June and a coronation festival at the Palace in July. It comes after the hectic diamond jubilee year of 2012.

In November, the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) will take place in Colombo, Sri Lanka.
The Queen has been present at every summit since she first attended in Ottawa, Canada, in 1973.

She missed the first one in 1971 in Singapore when British Prime Minister Edward Heath advised her not to attend because of a row over Britain selling arms to South Africa.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2287402/Healthy-happy-Queen-leaves-hospital-smiling-treated-nasty-stomach-bug.html#ixzz2MccmrGjl
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook