Guilty as charged

The Daily chimpanzee

 

I’ve said it before and I will say it again.

It is a little bit too coincidental that the Chimpanzee always seem to release an article that would either appear to be damage limitation, or refute an article that I released a day or two earlier.

It happens nearly a hundred percent of the time, so anyone who thinks I am too far up myself; fuck you.

A couple of days ago I lambasted an article that the Chimp put out which was obviously an attempt to portray the lads in our army as super heroes potentially sacrificing themselves selflessly to keep us safe… Total tosh touted by twats in other words.

In my article mauling the Chimps propaganda I also added a link leading to another of their story’s about how an army bod had needlessly shot dead one of the ‘enemy’ and I noted that this was more akin to our ‘brave’ soldiers than that of loving family men.

And then today, the Chimp just so happens to put out an article about the provocation that our boys face over in Afghanistan.

The article is in mitigation put forward as a defence for the Marines unlawful activities.

As far as I am concerned, no amount of horror stories are enough to make me sympathise with our army’s plight or are worthy of forgiveness for their crimes.

I don’t doubt for a second that articles like the following will work on the many, many clueless cunts there are that make up this once great nation.

Yet the simple fact remains that if we were not illegally invading these country’s for reasons that have absolutely fuck all to do with National Security, then these atrocities committed in retaliation of our country’s occupation would not happen.

The old saying; serves you right, instantly springs to mind.

 

 

‘Taliban hung our mates’ body parts from trees during six months of hell’: Horrific testimony of Marines fighting in ‘Death Valley’

  • Marines tried for murder of Taliban insurgent describe their ‘tour from hell’
  • One tells court martial that around 20 friends were will or maimed there

By DAVID WILLIAMS and IAN DRURY

PUBLISHED: 22:37, 8 November 2013 | UPDATED: 22:37, 8 November 2013

 

Constant danger: A British soldier on patrol in the village of Chah e-Anjir in Helmand. Many soldiers serving there in 2011 were deeply affectedConstant danger: A British soldier on patrol in the village of Chah e-Anjir in Helmand. Many soldiers serving there were deeply affected. (Stock image)

In a bleak corner of Helmand, only twisted, rusting barbed wire, rubble and broken blocks of concrete remain of what were once the British checkpoints of Kamiabi and Omar.

Yet two years ago they were considered vital to British operations and security in the region – a buffer against the Taliban, and during the summer of 2011, home to the Marines of 42 Commando.

They provided basic protection in a Taliban stronghold area known as ‘Death Valley’ and through the long hot months of the 2011 ‘fighting season’, clashes were so intense it was compared to the Zulu wars.

At its worst, it was a daily lottery for survival.

At one point during the six-month ‘tour to hell’, the body parts of British troops blown up by improvised explosive devices were hung in trees as trophies by Taliban fighters to taunt the Marines as they patrolled.

Some Marines have said they were also so concerned about running out of ammunition that they collected Taliban weapons and ammunition.

Indeed in the words of Marine C – one of the three man tried for the Afghan’s murder: ‘It is a s*** place out there, it’s not nice. It’s just a dirty, s***** war.’

Marine C told the court martial that around 20 friends had been killed or maimed during the six-month tour, including a popular young officer and a Marine who had previously won a Military Cross for courage under fire. He was blown up while searching a mud-walled compound.

Marine A, a hardened veteran of previous Afghan tours as well as Iraq, said other comrades had suffered ‘life changing’ injuries in the blast and described the effect the deaths had on the commandos.

He said they were not always able to recover the body parts of dead or maimed comrades. ‘It had quite a harsh affect. It’s not a nice thing for the lads.

‘Close friends they have lived with have been killed and parts of their bodies are displayed as a kind of trophy for the world to see.’

Marine B said he had been under attack ‘every single day’ and there had been ten casualties in one 24-hour period.

‘My friend’s legs had been put in a tree, I picked up my mate’s brains. I have no good memories of that tour. My way of coping with that was to put it away in a box at the back of my head.’

 

Uncertainty haunted daily patrols along routes pitted with booby traps and expertly buried bombs that could be triggered by a footfall.

Ambushes were an all-too-frequent danger. Locals who waved their greeting at one point would become an enemy to be feared the next – it was a common Taliban tactic for an attacker in a field to take a shot at patrols and then hide his weapon, picking up a farm tool instead.

‘Smiled in the back,’ was how one tour veteran termed it.

Some of the insurgents were called ‘ten dollar Taliban’. Marine A explained: ‘You find that fighting-age males would take part in the fighting season when the poppy season comes to an end and they are quite prepared to take ten dollars to fight.’

Isolated: A British patrol base in the area. The key concerns of the Marines who testified at the trial yesterday were said to be their limited numbers, their lack of air support and overwhelmingly a feeling of isolationIsolated: A British patrol base in the area. The key concerns of the Marines who testified at the trial yesterday were said to be their limited numbers, their lack of air support and a feeling of isolation. (Stock image)

 

A tipping point came in August 2011, when a popular Marine, James Wright, was badly wounded in an attack in which the Taliban tried to overrun a commando base.

Marines on patrol were horribly outnumbered. After a fierce battle they managed to get back to Kamiabi but the emboldened and reinforced Taliban attacked again and again.

Marine Wright, 23, was hit by a grenade and seriously wounded. The patrol commander called in air support from Apache helicopter gunships and the enemy dispersed. A Chinook helicopter flew Marine Wright to Camp Bastion, but he died.

Colleagues are said to have been furious they had been left so close to being overrun.

On patrol: Marine C told the court martial that around 20 friends had been killed or maimed during the six-month tour, including a popular young officer and a Marine who had won a Military Cross for courage under firePatrol: Marine C told the court martial that many friends were killed or maimed during the six-month tour, including a popular young officer and a Marine who had won a Military Cross for courage. (Stock image)

 

Dangerous work: Uncertainty haunted daily patrols along routes pitted with booby traps and expertly buried bombs that could be triggered by a footfall. On other occasions, ambush were an all-too-frequent dangerDangerous work: Uncertainty haunted daily patrols along routes pitted with booby traps and expertly buried bombs that could be triggered by a footfall. On other occasions, ambush was a frequent danger. (Stock image)

 

In the following weeks there were more attacks. The key concerns of the Marines were said to be their limited numbers, their lack of air support and overwhelmingly a feeling of isolation.

Marine C said when he left for Afghanistan he was ‘keen for action’ but his attitude altered as the tour progressed. ‘It soon became apparent this was not a game,’ he said. ‘I was drained, very stressed and constantly in fear, really.’

Marine A said humour like that captured on the video clips by fellow Marines – including swearing at the expense of Afghan nationals – could be seen as ‘inappropriate’ to those back in Britain.

‘But when you are facing on a daily basis people trying to kill you, you inject humour as a coping mechanism as otherwise I would say things would be very dark.’

It was against this backdrop of exhaustion, fear and loathing that the murder took place, with the contempt felt by some summed up by Marine A as he shot the fighter and said: ‘Shuffle off this mortal coil, you c***. It’s nothing you wouldn’t do to us.’

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2493892/Taliban-hung-mates-body-parts-trees-months-hell-Horrific-testimony-Marines-fighting-Death-Valley.html#ixzz2k9A5eczQ
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