Gareth Williams Death: Not so much an open & shut case, more a case of a shut & couldn’t get out of the case.

Chris Spivey

The Keystone Cops type investigation into how MI6 codebreaker Gareth Williams died, definitely belongs in the ‘you couldn’t make this shit up, don’t cha know’ files.

Despite Williams’ body being subjected to three post mortems, the third having been carried out by the UK’s leading pathologist, Dr Richard Shepherd, we are still no closer to finding out the cause of his death. But then again, whenever there is a top level cover up in play; the top guns are always brought out to muddy the waters.

And, as with all these farcical, ill thought out charades, it goes without saying that all the usual tactics we’re deployed including the old tried and tested favourite; ‘Leave it as long as possible between the date of death and the official verdict ‘. Williams died in August 2010.

In case you are not familiar with this comedy, the James Bond type character was found dead in his London flat, locked inside a sports-bag type holdall, found in his bath. Never the less, the Keystone Cops are adamant that no one else was involved in Williams death and maintain that it was a straight forward case of the spy locking himself in the holdall, only to find that he couldn’t get out again. That being the case, he promptly died.

But why would he do such a thing in the first place you ask?

“Oh that’s obvious” says the Mets top detective, Inspector Clueless(ret), “he was into all that bondage thingamajig kinky nonsense… Then again, aren’t we all guffaw, guffaw”.

This is despite Coroner, Fiona Wilcox telling an earlier inquest into the Secret Agent’s death, that it was nigh on impossible for Williams to have locked himself inside the bag.

Wilcox was backed by ‘Experts’ who testified that they had tried to lock themselves inside the bag more than 400 times without success. It was even claimed that the famed escapologist Harry Houdini would have had difficulty in doing so… Err, didn’t Houdini get out of locked bags rather than lock himself in them?… Sorry, do carry on.

The first ‘Expert’, A Mr Faulding, –  Faulding/Folding, you really, really, really couldn’t make this shit up – who is of similar height and build to Mr Williams, apparently had a bash at climbing into a matching bag inside a bath – like you do – 300 times, yet failed in all 300 attempts.

However, William MacKay, the second ‘Expert’ in “unusual occurrences” and confined places suggested rather helpfully in no ones opinion, that Mr Williams may have been able to do it himself, but it was very unlikely… Stop laughing for fucks sake. This is a serious matter.

Unfortunately, Mr MacKay and his assistant were obviously not as dedicated to the cause as Mr Folding… Sorry Faulding was. I base that on the fact that they could only be arsed to try bagging themselves up 100 times before getting the right hump and pissing off down the pub … Okay, I made that last bit up about them pissing off to the pub, but if the Keystone Cops can do it, then so can I.

Mr MacKay later enthusiastically told the inquest, held earlier this year, that he had actually come “reasonably close” on occasions to managing the nigh on impossible task.

Never the less, 400 fails out of 400 attempts is pretty conclusive evidence in my book.

“Fuck off” barked Inspector Clueless, “its pretty dam obvious that the pervert  ‘probably’ locked himself inside the bag… He had to have done”.

“Why’s that Inspector Clueless”, politely asked a journalist – stop giggling – from the Daily Telegraph.

“”No sign what so ever of a forced break in… Absolutely none… Bit of blood about, but then again that proves nothing. Well it couldn’t could it? No sign of a break in you see”, Crowed Clueless.

To be fair, the Keystone cops do have a point. After all, everyone in the world knows that when carrying out an assassination the first rule is to kick the cunts door down as noisily as possible.

So, with no forced entry, what were the Pathologists findings? There were three post mortems performed, after all.

First up, we had Dr Benjamin Swift. He said Mr Williams’ body was so badly decomposed it meant his cause of death could not be officially “ascertained”. Lot of fucking good Benny Boy was then!

“Hold on Spivey. Benny hasn’t finished”.

“My bad. Do carry on”.

Benjamin then went on to Swiftly say (did ya see what I did there… Benjamin Swift? Swiftly say? Forget it),  “poisoning or asphyxiation” were the “foremost contenders” for his death.

Hmmm. Sounds like he was murdered to me then. Someone probably kicked his door down, strangled him, put him in a bag in the bath, fixed the door, hoovered and then made a quick exit… What did the second pathologist have to say?

Glad you asked me that. Dr Ian Calder said, because of the restricted breathing space within the bag,  death from carbon dioxide poisoning was a “very likely possibility”.

Hmmmm. Sounds like misadventure to me then. He quite obviously locked himself in the bag in his bath and died from the smell… What did Pathologist number three, Tricky Dicky Shepherd have to say… He’ll know. He’s good him.

Well, as it happens Tricky was sure Mr Williams suffered an “unnatural death” and that poisoning or suffocation were the most likely causes. He added that  he believed Williams died in the bag.

C’mon Tricky, you can do better than that. You are after all the top man and as such you can’t just say that Agent double ‘O’ whatsisface sufferd an unnatural death.  I mean, you would be pushed to find anyone having a more unnatural death than some  poor bastard dying while locked up in a sports-bag.

Moreover, “unnatural death” has undertones of murder, yet you say that the fella probably died by poisoning or suffocation. In saying that, you are almost adding credence to Swift’s murder theory while at the same time, agreeing with Calder’s misadventure verdict. I demand better Tricky. What else have you got? You must have something else, surely.

Well yes, being as Dr Shepherd further added that there was no suggestion of Williams being “manhandled”into the bag… Huh? Thought the body was decomposed?

However – if you’ll let me finish – Tricky Dicky was also at pains to point out that there was always a possibility that Williams might have been coerced in to climbing into the bag himself, possibly even at gunpoint… Dan, dan dah!

That’s better Tricky. I knew that you wou… Hold up one fucking cotton picking moment Mofo! You can’t speculate shit like that at an inquest! In fact, it isn’t even your job to speculate about guns and the such like. Surely you’re aware that it is the Keystone Cops job to speculate about shit and stuff?

Mind you, having said that, Dr Richard Shepherd is an expert at this cover up malarky. He was after all, the Keystone Cops ‘Pathology Expert’ for Operation Paget, the investigation into Princess Diana’s death… “Car accident, driver was pissed, Simple as that, fuck off”.

And lets us not forget that Dr Shepherd was ever so helpful in the case of Dr David Kelly’s suspicious death. Here is what the aherm, aherm  internationaljusticeconference.com website has to say about the honourable man of integrity:

Dr Shepherd has recently provided the Attorney General with a review of the forensic pathological aspects of the death of Dr David Kelly, a scientist employed by the British Ministry of Defence and formerly a United Nations weapons inspector in Iraq.

He was sent to New York to advise on the management of UK fatalities following 9/11 and to Bali following the bomb attack on the Sari Club. He was also the forensic pathological expert for the Bloody Sunday Inquiry and the Inquiry and Inquest into the deaths of Diana, Princess of Wales and Mr Dodi Al Fayed.

He also worked on the controversial Rachel Nickell murder case in the UK.

Get the picture, wink, wink? Cool. Swiftly moving on before I find myself in court for libel; the Daily Mail had this to say about the Williams case:

The mysterious circumstances surrounding Mr Williams’ death sparked speculation that he could have been assassinated by the security services.

His MI6 colleagues did not report him missing for a week, and failed to hand over key evidence from their office, which raised the possibility that they could have been involved in a cover-up.

Huh? Failed to hand over key evidence… Bit suspect ain’t it? Anything else to add? The blood for instance?

Well, the Daily Mail hasn’t, but the Telegraph did mention this:

A forensic officer also apologised to Mr Willliams’ family after his blunder sent the police on a wild goose chase for more than a year.

Officers believed that they had recovered an unknown DNA sample from the back of Mr Williams’ hand.

It was not until February this year that it emerged the sample belonged to a forensic officer from the scene but there had been error when uploading it meaning it did not initially throw up a match.

In a written statement, Paul Stafford Allen apologise for the “distressed” it must have caused.

Are you fucking kidding me!

“Calm down Chris. They said they were sorry”.

I suppose that is true. Never the less, I can’t help thinking that all is not above board here. What says you Inspector Clueless?

‘”Look Spivey. My colleagues want to make it quite clear to everyone that they have been unable to find any trace of anyone who should not have been in the flat and as such, we have every reason to believe that Gareth may have climbed into the bag himself and been unable to get out. That being the case, my colleagues are now planning to inform the coroner of their belief that Mr Williams died alone… Stick to tattooing son. We will handle the clever stuff”.

Okay Inspector Clueless. Thank you for your help. Bye, bye…  Bollocks! Silly me. I forgot to ask him how Operation Yewtree is progressing. I’d forget me head me, if it wasn’t screwed on don’t cha know.

Until the next time,

Much love,

Chris.

MI6 spy found dead in bag ‘DID lock himself in holdall’ say police as they claim codebreaker was responsible for his own death

The Daily Mail 27/12/12

The MI6 codebreaker who was found dead inside a holdall probably locked himself inside the bag, according to police.

An inquest into the death of Gareth Williams found that he could have been the victim of foul play, as the coroner expressed doubts that he could have locked the bag himself.

However, Scotland Yard detectives investigating the case discovered that it is possible to lock the type of holdall he was found in from the inside, and now say it is likely that no one else was involved in Mr Williams’ death.

The body of the codebreaker, who was on secondment to MI6 from GCHQ, was discovered in a bathtub in his flat in Pimlico, central London, in August 2010.

Coroner Fiona Wilcox ruled earlier this year that it was unlikely Mr Williams could have locked himself into the red North Face holdall which contained his body and whose keys were also locked inside the bag.

Experts testified that they had tried to lock themselves inside the bag more than 400 times, and said even famed escapologist Harry Houdini would have had difficulty doing so.

But just a few days after Dr Wilcox delivered her verdict, a retired sergeant revealed that the feat was in fact possible, casting doubt on the assertion that someone else must have been involved in Mr Williams’ death.

Police refined the experiment to mirror the exact way the bag had been locked – and agreed that Mr Williams could have secured the holdall himself, according to the Daily Telegraph.

In addition, detectives do not believe there is any evidence of forced entry which could suggest that the codebreaker was murdered.

Locked: Mr Williams' body was found inside a red North Face holdall similar to this oneLocked: Mr Williams’ body was found inside a red North Face holdall similar to this one

‘They have been unable to find any trace of anyone who should not have been in the flat and every reason to believe that Gareth may have climbed into the bag himself and been unable to get out,’ an inquiry source told the Telegraph.

Police are now apparently planning to inform the coroner of their belief that Mr Williams died alone.

 

Dr Wilcox initially dismissed the idea that the spy could have been the victim of ‘auto-erotic activity’ – but detectives say there is no other plausible explanation for his death.

The mysterious circumstances surrounding Mr Williams’ death sparked speculation that he could have been assassinated by the security services.

His MI6 colleagues did not report him missing for a week, and failed to hand over key evidence from their office, which raised the possibility that they could have been involved in a cover-up.

Investigation: Police have denied that foul play was responsible for the codebreaker's deathInvestigation: Police have denied that foul play was responsible for the codebreaker’s death

However, others pointed to an apparent interest in bondage and cross-dressing as a more likely explanation for his death.

Mr Williams was once found by his landlord tied to his own bed wearing only underwear, while he apparently kept £20,000 worth of women’s clothes in his flat.

A spokesman for the Metropolitan Police declined to confirm the detectives’ latest findings, saying: ‘This remains an active investigation and officers continue to explore a number of lines of inquiry.

‘Officers retain an open mind in relation to the circumstances surrounding the death of Mr Williams.’

MI6 spy Gareth Williams ‘probably died from poisoning or asphyxiation’

 

The Telegraph, 30/4/12

MI6 spy Gareth Williams is most likely to have died from poisoning, suffocation or strangulation, his inquest heard today.

Pathologist Dr Benjamin Swift said Mr Williams’ body was so badly decomposed it meant his cause of death could not be officially “ascertained”.

But he said “poisoning or asphyxiation” were the “foremost contenders” for his death.

The court heard how he could have been dead within “two to three minutes” of being in bag due to the levels of carbon dioxide that would have quickly built up.

The inquest at Westminster Coroners’ Court is investigating Mr Williams’ death, whose decomposing, naked body was found in a padlocked holdall in his bath at his flat in Pimlico in August 2010.

It has already heard that some poisons may not show up in a post mortem because of the level of decomposition.

Dr Swift estimated Mr Williams’ body had been in the bag for ten days.

A second pathologist, Dr Ian Calder said death from carbon dioxide poisoning, because of the restricted breathing space within the bag, was a “very likely possibility”.

Dr Richard Shepherd, who carried out a third post mortem, said he was sure Mr Williams suffered an “unnatural death” and that poisoning or suffocation were the most likely causes.

He said he believed he died in the bag.

Evidence of slight bruising and grazing were also found on Mr Williams’ arms but the three separate post mortem examinations failed to find any evidence of a “traumatic” death or struggle.

Dr Shepherd said there was no suggestion he had been “manhandled” but could not rule out he might have been coerced to climb in to it himself, possibly even gunpoint.

He said the slight bruising and grazes could have come from being inside the bag.

But even if he was aware of his predicament and attempted to escape, the padlock on the bag would have “sealed” his fate, he said.

The sixth day of the inquest also heard how police followed a potential DNA clue for more than year before it emerged it belonged to a forensic officer who attended the scene.

An error in recording the data for checking on the database meant no match was initially found suggesting a mystery person was at the flat.

Evidence from forensics officers showed spots of blood were found on the carpet near the kitchen, on the edge of the bath and in the communal doorway.

They also recovered “very weak” traces of blood from the bag handles and padlock. The inquest has already heard that police are still investigating those traces.

A forensic officer also apologised to Mr Willliams’ family after his blunder sent the police on a wild goose chase for more than a year.

Officers believed that had recovered an unknown DNA sample from the back of Mr Williams’ hand.

It was not until February this year that it emerged the sample belonged to a forensic officer from the scene but there had been error when uploading it meaning it did not initially throw up a match.

In a written statement, Paul Stafford Allen apologise for the “distressed” it must have caused.

Gareth Williams

The inquest heard on Friday how Mr Williams must have been “dead or unconscious” when placed in to the sports bag.

Peter Faulding, a former Parachute Regiment reservist and expert in confined rescues, concluded that not even Harry Houdini could have padlocked himself in the holdall in the bath.

His revelations will further fuel theories that the 31-year-old codebreaker may have been killed.

The maths prodigy had been on secondment to MI6 from GCHQ when he died.

The issue of whether Mr Williams could lock himself in the bag is central to the inquiry and has fuelled theories that a third party was involved.

The inquest at Westminster Coroners’ Court is investigating Mr Williams’ death, whose decomposing, naked body was found in a padlocked holdall in his bath at his flat in Pimlico in August 2010.

Video footage of attempts to recreate climbing in to an 81cm by 48 cm holdall and locking it was shown to the court.

Mr Faulding, who is of similar height and build to Mr Williams, tried to climb in to a bag inside a bath and lock it himself 300 times and failed every time.

The inquest heard that if Mr Willliams had been alive when he went in to the bath, he would have been dead within 30 minutes.

A bag similar to the one in which Gareth Williams was found

Oxygen levels dropped to 17 per cent and the temperature rose by 10 per cent within five minutes.

However, another expert in “unusual occurrences” and confined places suggested Mr Williams may have been able to do it himself but it was very unlikely.

William MacKay and a colleague tried and failed 100 times although they came “reasonably close” at times.

He said: “There are people who can do amazing things and Mr Williams may well be one of those persons.”

It also emerged a homemade video showing Mr Williams naked except for black leather boots in which he “wiggles and girates” with his back to the camera was on one of his iPhones.

Evidence of visits to bondage and fetish websites were also found on his phones and lap tops.

Web records also showed he once searched for bondage sites and watched a YouTube video after typing “dress bondage training”.

Pages from 2008 showed he may have looked at sites relating to “hogtie”, a bondage method of tying the limbs together.

His last internet activity was during the early hours of Monday August 16, a week before his body was discovered, and one of his phone had had its factory settings restored – the equivalent of wiping a hard drive.

The phone was backed up on August 15th but it is not known when it was reset.

The hearing continues