Dying to die

The Daily Chimpanzee

 

Morning. Just a quick heads up, there will be no Sunday Spiv tomorrow.

Unfortunately I am far too busy with other matters.

So without further achoo a jew ado here is today’s offering, although I have a couple more that I may add later.

Now, as I scrolled down the Chimps wall this morning, I quickly came upon the following story – although I didn’t at first take any notice of it.

You see, the story is about an English aid worker who was working over in Kenya, caught Malaria and died the next fucking day:

A young British aid worker has died from malaria while volunteering at a primary school in Kenya, it emerged today.

Christi Kelly, 21, was cooking meals for poverty-stricken children and teaching them to dance when she fell ill. She was taken to a hospital six hours away in the capital, Nairobi, on Tuesday but died the following day.

Miss Kelly’s stunned family from Ilfracombe, Devon, said she had all the necessary injections and was taking anti-malaria tablets when she contracted the virus.

 
Sudden death: Christi Kelly, left, from Ilfracombe, Devon, died of Malaria while volunteering in Kenya

 

The former university student was three months into a ten-month European Union assignment with Moving Mountains, a trust which improves social conditions in Kenya.

She was stationed in the western county of Siaya, living at an orphanage and teaching dance at the local primary school.

Miss Kelly’s heartbroken mother Carol Kelly said she was desperate for answers about her daughter’s death.

She last spoke with her on Sunday, when Miss Kelly said she had been in bed and was feeling unwell.

Carol Kelly, 41, said: ‘She was teaching the children to dance, she absolutely loved it out there.

‘She was living at the orphanage and teaching at the primary school. She taught dance but she obviously helped out with the cooking and so on.

‘As far as we’re aware, everything happened very quickly.

‘I think she went to hospital on Tuesday and died on Wednesday morning at around 6 a.m. – but it’s all very unclear at the moment.  Read more

Now I’m sure you will agree that although tragic, shit happens and it isn’t the kind of story that I would normally add to the site.

However, as I continued scrolling down I came upon another story that adds a whole new dimension to Christi Kelly’s death.

You see, the article in question was about a “revolutionary” new drug created by scientists that the Sniffenpissin cunts estimate will save up to 620,000 lives per year… Cos our government is in to saving lives, don’t cha know.

And of course, this wonderful, wonderful, oh so very wonderful wonder drug is designed to protect you from lethal strains of malaria.

Scientists have created a ‘revolutionary’ vaccine that can protect against lethal strains of malaria and save hundreds of thousands of lives year.

The vaccine, been developed from Tanzanian children naturally resistant to the disease, works by imprisoning the Malaria-causing parasites inside the red blood cells they infect.

The researchers said that an experimental vaccine based on this idea protected mice in five trials and will be tested on lab monkeys beginning in the next four to six weeks.

Naughty, naughty, cheeky sneaky, Monkey Boys.

Course, the semi-retarded, self perceived ‘critical thinking’ Brits will be positively dying to have this new vaccine before heading off on holiday to Africa… Literally.

As for me?

Well I just thank Dog that I am a tinfoil hat wearing madman who would stick the syringe needle deep into the doctors eyeball rather than let him inject me with that shit… Just sayin’ of course.

 

 

Malaria vaccine could be ready in TWO YEARS – and would save 620,000 lives a year

  • Rhode Island Hospital created a trial vaccine using an antibody that imprisons the Malaria-causing parasites inside the blood cells they infect
  • Antibody was found in Tanzanian children naturally resistant to malaria
  • Injecting a form of it into mice protected the creatures against the disease
  • Testing on lab monkeys is expected begin in the next four to six weeks

By ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD

Scientists have created a ‘revolutionary’ vaccine that can protect against lethal strains of malaria and save hundreds of thousands of lives year.

The vaccine, been developed from Tanzanian children naturally resistant to the disease, works by imprisoning the Malaria-causing parasites inside the red blood cells they infect.

The researchers said that an experimental vaccine based on this idea protected mice in five trials and will be tested on lab monkeys beginning in the next four to six weeks.

Scientists at Rhode Island Hospital created a trial vaccine using an antibody that imprisons the Malaria-causing parasites inside the blood cells they infect. Pictured here is a malaria-infected red blood cell

Scientists at Rhode Island Hospital created a trial vaccine using an antibody that imprisons the Malaria-causing parasites inside the blood cells they infect. Pictured here is a malaria-infected red blood cell

Dr Jonathan Kurtis, director of Rhode Island Hospital’s Center for International Health Research, said if the monkey trials go well, a trial testing the vaccine in a small group of people could begin within a year and a half.

Malaria is thought to kill around 627,000 people each year with as many as one child a minute dying Africa. Many of the children who survive the infection go on to have serious health problems later in life.

Using blood samples and epidemiological data collected from hundreds of children in Tanzania, where malaria is endemic, by Dr Patrick Duffy and Dr Michal Fried of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the researchers pinpointed a protein.

The researchers said that an experimental vaccine based on this idea protected mice in five trials and will be tested on lab monkeys beginning in the next four to six weeks

The researchers said that an experimental vaccine based on this idea protected mice in five trials and will be tested on lab monkeys beginning in the next four to six weeks

Named PfSEA-1, the parasites need this protein in order to escape from inside red blood cells they infect as they cause malaria.

The researchers then found that antibodies sent by the body’s immune system to take action against this protein managed to trap the parasites inside the red blood cells, blocking the progression of the disease.

HOW DOES THE VACCINE WORK?

Using blood samples from hundreds of children in Tanzania, where malaria is endemic, scientists pinpointed a protein called
PfSEA-1.

The parasites need this protein in order to escape from inside red blood cells they infect as they cause malaria.

Scientists found that an antibody produced by the immune children hits the malaria parasite at a critical stage in its life-cycle by taking action against this protein.

This traps the tiny organism in red blood cells, preventing it from getting out of the cell and spreading throughout the body.

Tests, carried out in groups of mice, suggest this antibody could act as a potential vaccine.

Scientists have struggled for years to create an effective vaccine against malaria, a mosquito-borne disease that affects mostly children in sub-Saharan Africa.

‘It’s profoundly important to develop an effective malaria vaccine,’ said Dr Anthony Fauci, director of the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, calling the study ‘a novel and different type of an approach toward a vaccine.’

‘Since the malaria parasite has such a complex replication cycle, there are multiple points in that replication cycle that are vulnerable to interference by an antibody or some response that can be induced by a vaccine,’ Dr Fauci said.

Microscopic malaria parasites are carried in the saliva of female mosquitoes and enter a person’s bloodstream through the insect’s bite.

The parasites pass through the liver and infect red blood cells. They replicate wildly in these cells and cause them to rupture, flooding the body with more and more parasites.

Two existing approaches to vaccine development have sought to block the parasites from entering the liver or red blood cells.

The antibody was found in a group of children in Tanzania who are naturally immune to malaria. Injecting a form of it into mice protected the creatures against the disease (stock image used)

The antibody was found in a group of children in Tanzania who are naturally immune to malaria. Injecting a form of it into mice protected the creatures against the disease (stock image used)

The new approach instead tries to bottle them up inside the red blood cells – or, as Dr Kurtis put it, ‘trap them inside a burning house.’

If the parasites remain trapped, they can be harmlessly eaten up in the spleen by immune system cells called macrophages, Dr Kurtis said.

The researchers developed a vaccine that targeted PfSEA-1 and tried it on mice.

In five experiments, vaccinated mice that were exposed to malaria had parasite levels four times lower than unvaccinated mice and survived twice as long afterward.

The researchers then looked at blood samples from some of the Tanzanian children. Roughly one in 20 had naturally occurring levels of the antibodies that target PfSEA-1, and among these children there were no cases of severe malaria.

The researchers also examined blood samples from 138 boys and men from a malaria-endemic area of Kenya.

Those with detectable levels of naturally occurring antibodies to PfSEA-1 had 50 per cent lower parasite levels than those who did not.

Dr Kurtis expressed hope about the prospects of a vaccine targeting this protein, but said the best future vaccine likely would combine this approach with others to attack the parasite on several fronts.

He noted that there is currently no licensed vaccine for human parasitic infection.

Malaria, which can be carried by mosquitoes, is thought to kill around 627,000 people each year with as many as one child a minute dying Africa. Many of the children who survive the infection go on to have serious health problems later in life

Malaria, which can be carried by mosquitoes, is thought to kill around 627,000 people each year with as many as one child a minute dying Africa. Many of the children who survive the infection go on to have serious health problems later in life

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2637247/Malaria-vaccine-ready-TWO-YEARS-save-620-000-lives-year.html#ixzz32cvpmjbC
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