Davey Arfwit & the Furbie – when you were sweet sixteen

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Computer Weekly, with thanks to Jimmy Jones.

 

Well you wouldn’t expect any different from a couple of lying elitist piss taking parasites would you?

“Sweaty and the Duck, Spiv?”

The Cunt and the Bean as it happens Voice of Reason.

“Gotcha. What have the gay blades been up to now?”

Well, you know all those speeches packed full of promises that the pair of lying cunts made when they were hoping to win the election?

“No”.

Yes you do Voice!  The ones where the sexual deviants promised you the earth in return for your vote.

“Ohhh, you mean the fanny from the fanny’s! What about them”? 

Well the pair of inbred, fat titted, soft jowlled, wicked, warped, wankers have only gone and had them all removed from the internet so as Broken Brained Brit Man and his wife can’t be alerted to the fact that they have been conned left right and centre.

“Gotcha again… Why are you so pissed off about it though. You know that they are a pair of lying, low life, limp dicked, lunatics… As for the minuscule minded, meek and medicated masses? They are happy being dumb fucks as long as they are not perceived as being such”.   

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True, very, very true Voice.

“I gotta tell ya Spiv? I am a bit confused as to what the song has to do with the article”?

Absolutely fuck all Voice… I just like making the Monsters look like cunts.

“Fair do’s”.

Errr, I don’t suppose that there is any chance of a blow job is there?

“No”.

 

 

Conservatives erase Internet history

By Mark Ballard on November 12, 2013 5:02 PM | 3 Comments

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The Conservative Party has attempted to erase a 10-year backlog of speeches from the internet, including pledges for a new kind of transparent politics the prime minister and chancellor made when they were campaigning for election.

Prime minister David Cameron and chancellor George Osborne campaigned on a promise to democratise information held by those in power, so people could hold them to account. They wanted to use the internet transform politics.

But the Conservative Party has removed the archive from its public facing website, erasing records of speeches and press releases going back to the year 2000 and up until it was elected in May 2010.

It also struck the record of their past speeches off internet engines including Google, which had been a role model for Cameron and Osborne’s “open source politics”.

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And it erased the official record of their speeches from the Internet Archive, the public record of the net – with an effect as alarming as sending Men in Black to strip history books from a public library and burn them in the car park.

Sometime after 5 October, when Computer Weekly last took a snapshot of a Conservative speech from the Internet Archive, the Tory speech and news archive was eradicated.

Conservatives posted a robot blocker on their website, which told search engines and the Internet Archive they were no longer permitted to keep a record of the Conservative Party web archive.

The Internet Archive was unavailable for comment. But a fortnight after Computer Weekly started asking its San Francisco HQ for an explanation, the Conservative speeches have begun reappearing on its site.

CW had asked the Internet Archive to explain how the historic record of the lead party in the coalition that holds power in the UK could simply be erased.

David Cameron and George Osbourne at Northern Rock Conference

 

The Conservative Party’s robot blocker forced the Internet Archive to remove the entire record of speeches and news it had collected, in 1,158 snapshots it took of the Conservative website since 8 May 1999.

The Conservative bot blocker listed all the pages barred for public consumption thus (excerpt):

Disallow: /News/News_stories/2000/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2001/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2002/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2003/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2004/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2005/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2006/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2007/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2008/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2009/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/01/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/02/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/03/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/04/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/05/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2000/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2001/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2002/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2003/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2004/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2005/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2006/

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Disallow: /News/Speeches/2007/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2008/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2009/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/01/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/02/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/03/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/04/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/05/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2000/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2001/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2002/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2003/

osborne-and-cameron
Disallow: /News/Articles/2004/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2005/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2006/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2007/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2008/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2009/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/01/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/02/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/03/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/04/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/05/

For pages at these addresses, the Internet Archive reported: “Page cannot be crawled or displayed due to robots.txt”.

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An administrator at the Internet Archive HQ in San Francisco said its guidance for lawyers explained the mechanism. That was that if a website, like Conservatives.com, put up a robot blocker, those pages it blocked would simply be erased from the record as a matter of etiquette.

The erasure had the effect of hiding Conservative speeches in a secretive corner of the internet like those that shelter the military, secret services, gangsters and paedophiles.

The Conservative Party HQ was unavailable for comment. A spokesman said he had referred the matter to a “website guy”, who was out of the office.

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It wasn’t always going to be like this.

Such as when the prime minister first floated his groovy idea that the democratisation of information would transform politics, at the Google Zeitgeist Europe Conference, on 22 May 2006.

“You’ve begun the process of democratising the world’s information,” he told the Googlers. “Democratising is the right word to use because by making more information available to more people, you’re giving them more power.

“Above all, the power for anyone to hold to account those who in the past might have had a monopoly of power – whether it’s government, big business, or the traditional media,” said Cameron, who was then campaigning for power as leader of the Conservative opposition.

Cameron and osborne all snug and cosy with james murdoch

 

Cameron was going to make sure the information revolution would hold people like prime ministers to account, he said another speech on 11 October 2007, at the Google Zeitgeist Conference in San Francisco.

“It’s clear to me that political leaders will have to learn to let go,” he said then. “Let go of the information that we’ve guarded so jealously.”

Transparency would make public officials accountable to the people, said Cameron then. He was riding at the front of the wave that would wash us into a new world, and a new age.

Likewise the chancellor, who on delivering his landmark “Open Source Politics” speech at the Royal Society of Arts on 8 March 2007, declared his ambition was “to recast the political settlement for the digital age”.

“We need to harness the Internet to help us become more accountable, more transparent and more accessible – and so bridge the gap between government and governed,” said Osborne.

“The democratization of access to information… is eroding traditional power and informational imbalances.

“No longer is there an asymmetry of information between the individual and the state, or between the layperson and the expert,” said the Chancellor when he was campaigning for election.

If the Conservative Party had moved its speeches and news archive to a more convenient location it had managed to do it in a way that hid it from the search engines. It might before long end up at the Oxford University’s Bodleian Library, which keeps the official Conservative Party archive of really old stuff like speeches from the days before the internet.

The robot blocker – a robots.txt file – tells software bots run by sites like Google and the Internet Archive to bog off. The bots grab web pages for the benefit of plebs like those Cameron and Osborne claimed to be speaking for in those years before they were elected. The bots were what made the democratization of information possible. It was bots that inspired Cameron and Osborne. It was bots that were going to free us from serfdom in the way they said we would be. Without the bots you just had pockets of power and privilege for those in the know. Without the bots you just had the same old concentration of wealth and power there had always been, since long before the Internet Archive started taking snapshots of the Conservative website in 1999.

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