A strong stench of monkey shite

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Spiv & Chimps

 

I don’t know what it is about the Chimp but they do like to advertise these so called “tribes that time forgot”.

Course, I have commented on this type of old Monkey fanny before but still they persist on touting a narrative that is easily disproved just by the accompanying photos alone.

On this occasion Dacre’s Dunces are writing about the Hadza tribe from Africa, who supposedly live a life unchanged for 10,000 years.

Indeed, I seriously doubt that there are any tribes left on earth that have remained unchanged for 50 years let alone 10,000.

In fact the Chimps article makes little sense whatsoever.

The article itself starts off with the Chimp writers describing what they presumably consider to be progress:

Never before has our world been so connected or convenient. With the click of a button we can change the channel, drop the heat or book a trip to Barbados. Our food is grown, produced and plated-up to our exact liking. Drive-thrus, home deliveries, medical advances and the right to education.

“With the click of a button we can change the channel!”… But a TV isn’t referred to as the “idiot box” for nothing don’t cha know.

“Our food is grown, produced and plated-up to our exact liking!”… Unhealthy, sweet tasting shit, sprayed with and full of cancer giving chemicals then.

“Medical advances!”… Like what? Chemotherapy? Antibiotics? Antidepressants? Child vaccinations? Substandard hospitals & medical staff with Doctors given bribes to prescribe dangerous medicines?

“The right to education!”… Or put another way, being force fed lies? Taught black is white, wrong is right, right is left? Making sure that our kids obey, conform, obey, conform, obey, conform… I am a robot, I am a robot?

Indeed, none of that sounds very “convenient or connected” from where I’m sitting.

Never the less, the Chimps opening gambit gives them an opportunity to then pose the question: “So why are we so stressed, overweight and dreaming of being free?”

Derrrr, I really, really can’t think why we are so stressed Monkey Man, at least not now that you have pointed out how bastard lucky we are… Still, at least the shit-rag has acknowledged that we aren’t free.

The Monkey Boys then get to the point of the article:

On the banks of Tanzania’s Lake Eyasi, in the north of the country, lives the world’s last hunter-gatherer tribe. They don’t grow food, raise livestock or build permanent shelter. Instead they live a life unchanged for more than 10-thousand years.

There are about 1000 of them… Apparently. And they all live in caves.

The Hadza show us how to track animals, from baboon to snakes to lions, but we have to run to keep up - they don't pander to westerners one bit

And wear leather sandals – no doubt crafted from strips of leather carefully trimmed from the leather trees scattered here, there and everyfuckingwhere – and skirts made from Denim, no doubt dug from the ground… After all, Africa is well known for its huge Denim deposits just waiting to be mined.

Then there are the tops they wear, woven from the skins of the Black & Orange Polka Dot Monkey’s and topped off with string bead fashion accessory painstakingly carved out of the pink plastic stones to be found laying around on the jungle floor.

However, to be fair the lying cunts do try to explain some of these anomalies away – which is a damned sight more than they usually do:

the closest thing to currency is the occasional trade for a pair of shorts or sandals with a neighbouring tribe.

Well, I suppose they had to explain where the young fella in the photo below got his belt from didn’t they!

The Hadza are hugely skilled with their handmade bow and arrow - we have a go and barely get the arrow to go three feet in front of us

Course, the newspaper forgot to name the tribe that the Hadza trade with although my guess is it will be the Asda tribe.

Moreover, the newspaper also forgot to say what the Hadza use to trade with. I mean, according to the article they have fuck all… Apart from meat:

They do not engage in conflict, and have no memory of infectious outbreaks or starvation. Their population never exceeds numbers that cannot be sustained through hunting or gathering. The Hadza diet is simple. Meat – including birds, baboons, antelope and buffalo – killed by hand-made bows and arrows, crafted in-between hunting trips.

“Their population never exceeds numbers that cannot be sustained through hunting or gathering”? Is that a subtle message to us all?

Are the Hadza eugenicists? Crikey!

Yet I would have thought that the Asda tribe – or whoever  it is the Hadza trade with – were quite capable of getting their own meat.

And anyway, where did this other tribe get their stocks of sandals, shorts and belts from in order to trade with the Hadza – who have diddly squat to trade with in the first fucking place?

Never the less, I would have thought that a diet of “birds, baboons, antelope and buffalo” wouldn’t be particularly good for you. After all, even Eskimos eat fish.

And then things get really confusing.

You see, about halfway down the article – which is entirely about the Hadzas – the reader is told to: “Scroll down for video”

But when you watch the video, the tribe look to be more South American than African.

desYet if the tribe shown in the video isn’t the Hadza, why the fuck is that fact not made clear?

And if that is the case, why have a video about another tribe attached to an article specifically written about the Hadza?

I don’t know about bullshit, but there is certainly more than a whiff of Monkey shite… Just sayin’.

Now, while this may seem a trivial matter given the articles content in comparison to the major happenings taking place in the world at the moment, it is still important… We are being lied to by the country’s 2nd biggest selling newspaper and if they resort to making up bullshit about unimportant matters that are neither here nor there, imagine the depth of the lies in the stories that do have major consequences on our lives?

I am sick to fucking death of being taken for a cunt in every single aspect of my life by corrupt Sharts with an agenda… They all have to go.

 

 

The tribe time forgot: Hunting baboons with Tanzania’s Hadza people who have lived a life unchanged for 10,000 years

  • Africa’s Hadza tribe is world’s last hunter-gathering community living in the wilds of Tanzania
  • The tribe hunts baboons, birds, antelope and buffalo with hand-made bows and arrows
  • There are about 1,000 Hadza living in caves around Lake Eyasi in Africa’s Great Rift Valley
  • The tribe has lived the same way, unencumbered by the outside world, for 10,000 years 
  • Their language, rhythmic and punctuated by clicks, is believed to be the oldest still spoken

By Stephanie Hunt And Benjamin Hogarth

Never before has our world been so connected or convenient. With the click of a button we can change the channel, drop the heat or book a trip to Barbados. Our food is grown, produced and plated-up to our exact liking. Drive-thrus, home deliveries, medical advances and the right to education.

In a short space of time, life has transformed to one of convenience. So why are we so stressed, overweight and dreaming of being free? Have we forgotten something our ancestors knew? Africa’s Hadza tribe is the closest we’ll get to looking into that past.

On the banks of Tanzania’s Lake Eyasi, in the north of the country, lives the world’s last hunter-gatherer tribe. They don’t grow food, raise livestock or build permanent shelter. Instead they live a life unchanged for more than 10-thousand years.

Their world is one of ultimate freedom – something modern society can barely imagine and is unlikely to ever experience. Let alone have the skills in which to stay alive. Text messages and phone calls don’t exist. Nor cars and electricity. No jobs, bosses, timetables, social or religious structures. No laws, taxes and incredibly, no money – the closest thing to currency is the occasional trade for a pair of shorts or sandals with a neighbouring tribe.

We spent our time with the Hadza hunting baboon, a daily activity for the men, in what is a hot, harsh climate. Their landscape is precariously packed with thorny bushes, poisonous snakes and man-eating lions. But a successful hunting expedition is the difference between eating or going hungry.

Scroll down for video 

Young boy wears pigeon feathers ahead of a day's hunt - the scarification on his face are traditional markings

A young boy holds a pigeon-like bird, which he killed to eat after hunting it with a homemade bow and arrow

A young Hadza boy (left), wearing feathers in his hair, prepares for the day’s hunt while an another holds a pigeon-like bird he killed with a homemade bow and arrow

All weapons used for hunting by the Hadza people are handmade with materials found around Tanzania's Lake Eyasi

All weapons used for hunting by the Hadza people are handmade with materials found around Tanzania’s Lake Eyasi

About one-thousand Hadza still live in caves around Tanzania’s Lake Eyasi in Africa’s Great Rift Valley. Just south of here some of the oldest fossil evidence of early Hominids were discovered. By all modern standards, the Hadza shouldn’t really exist. They remain an anomaly. A tribe time has forgotten.

They do not engage in conflict, and have no memory of infectious outbreaks or starvation. Their population never exceeds numbers that cannot be sustained through hunting or gathering. The Hadza diet is simple. Meat – including birds, baboons, antelope and buffalo – killed by hand-made bows and arrows, crafted in-between hunting trips.

Their language is believed to be the oldest still-spoken language known to man … a rhythmic dialect punctuated by clicking sounds. A linguist’s dream.

Unlike the modern-day office dweller, the Hadza enjoys an extraordinary amount of leisure time. Their ‘work’ – hunting for food – take up around five hours of their day. And over all these thousands of years, they’ve left little more than a footprint on their land. The Hadza represents a part of the world’s cultural make-up, which has all but gone. But the greatest tragedy is they may also represent what we’ve all lost.

The Hadza show us how to track animals, from baboon to snakes to lions, but we have to run to keep up - they don't pander to westerners one bit

The Hadza show us how to track animals, from baboon to snakes to lions, but we have to run to keep up – they don’t pander to westerners one bit

The Hadza are hugely skilled with their handmade bow and arrow - we have a go and barely get the arrow to go three feet in front of us

The Hadza are hugely skilled with their handmade bow and arrow – we have a go and barely get the arrow to go three feet in front of us

In the morning the boys and men gather in a circle to sharpen their homemade spears and smoke tobacco through a pipe - this is the most social part of their day

In the morning the boys and men gather in a circle to sharpen their homemade spears and smoke tobacco through a pipe – this is the most social part of their day

A boy heads with older boys on baboon hunt. They wear baboon skin wraps. They must hunt down and kill at least ??? baboons before they are permitted to wear these wraps and be considered a capable hunter.

Hunters head out wearing baboon skin wraps – they must earn the right to wear these by proving themselves to be a capable hunter; and a baboon skull

Stephanie and Ben are Middle East-based Australian journalists, who took a year’s leave to learn more about the world. They wandered through West Africa, Ethiopia, Sudan, Rwanda, Kenya and Tanzania, and lived with some of the world’s most remote and endangered tribes. 

Their journey has been captured through photos, movies and interviews. Through their Habari Productions the couple sell prints from their journeys, with profits going back to the African people who touched their hearts.

Their book, ‘Tribe: Life on the Edge – A story of beauty and survival’, is also available.